SEO GUIDE : Free tactics to increase google rank

SEO GUIDE : Free tactics to increase google rank

blogging, Grow fast in startup, marketing, marketting, Uncategorized

You can easily boost your google ranking by following 5 tactics.

1: Referral Traffic

According to Conductor, search engines direct about 47% of online traffic. Of all the sources, search engines represent a plurality of directed traffic. But that means the majority of traffic is independent of search engine rankings. According to the same Conductor study, non-social referral visits account for 15% of the internet’s traffic. Even using Conductor’s sample size of 310 million hits, that’s 4.7 million referral clicks.

This is my way of saying that links don’t only lead to search engine traffic. A well-placed link on an authority site can direct an abundance of referral traffic.

2 : BRANDING

Right now in the world of SEO, it’s more important than ever to be cognizant of anchor text diversity. Google is not fond of sites that use the same keyword-rich anchor text over and over.

So along with keyword and white noise anchors, branded anchors should absolutely be part of your link profile.

This is a good thing. Being “forced” to use your brand name as an anchor is a way of simply getting your name out there. Even if a user doesn’t click the first time seeing your name, the more that user sees your name, the more that user is going to be compelled to click. And once they click, they are led to the biggest branding opportunity you have: your site.

There’s no better representation of your brand than your website, and link building is a valuable way to get people to look at your brand in all of its glory.

3 : BUILDING AUTHORITY

So your name is out there now. As I said before, established brand names can still thrive even when having a negative reputation. Now take a look at what their customers think of them.

Getting links on authority sites is a great way to have some authority rub off on you. Not only is the link viewed as a vote of confidence by search engines, more importantly, it’s viewed as a vote of confidence by users.

4 : RELATIONSHIP BUILDING

If you’re building links without building relationships, you’re doing it wrong.

I can’t emphasize enough how much easier link building is when you have relationships within your niche to rely upon.

Let’s say your primary online strategy to gain visibility is through the usage of social media. Building a legitimate following on social media is one of the most trying tasks of going that route. When I say legitimate, I mean gaining followers without bios like this:

Did you ever think that you can gain followers outside of the parameters of social media? It happens to me frequently. I attract a few followers every time I get a link, and the majority of the time the followers are people I’ve never talked to in the realms of social media channels.

Relationship building leads to visibility, no matter where you want to be seen.

Our link building campaigns have often created new relationships for clients, relationships which have provided benefits outside of SEO. Think partnership or advertising opportunities. Without our link building services, those relationships would not exist.

5 : PROMOTION

So you have great content. Now what? As awesome as, say, your info graphic might be, people aren’t going to find it without being pointed towards it.

You might be saying, “What about social media? Wouldn’t it be easier to share it on our social media channels?”

I’m never going to advocate being absent on social media. Even if social signals are not part of Google’s algorithm, they have indirect effects on rankings.

Even though social media is an effective method of promotion, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be building links as well in your promotional efforts.

12 steps to raise capital for your startup

business, Grow fast in startup, Uncategorized
Step 1It always starts with an ‘Idea’. Having an idea is not enough to attract funds. You will need to dig deep into your idea, breaking your idea into parts with the intention to identify what is ‘unique’ about it. What solution are you providing and to what problem? You will have to find out what is your ‘Most Unique Feature’ that helps you stand out from others. Once you have identified it, try to define it in a couple of words and that becomes yourUnique Selling Point’. Use this to develop your elevator pitch, starting what is the problem, what is your solution and how is it unique? All summed up in less than a minute.
Step 2Transform words to a prototype. Now that you are able to define your USP, try to develop a prototype’ around it. When I say prototype, it is not necessary that it has to be a finished product sample. You could take that unique feature of yours and put it into a PowerPoint, Photoshop, or draw it out on a piece of paper, so that you could show it to your potential investors. Investors like to see things that are‘tangible’. And also you could develop a ‘small animated video’ about how your product and the key feature of it ‘works out’ to be (could be as simple as a ‘flowchart’).
Step 3Take an outside perspective (sampling). Once you have your prototype, see if you can ‘test it/do a bit of reconnaissance’, which means go out see what others have to say about your prototype. When I say others focus on your ‘prospective customers’. Take a ‘good proportionate and a representative sample’ of it and try to ‘record’ their experience, this will help you in developing a market research report, that will come handy later on. During this step, see whether your customers are able to make head or tail of it. Also try to identify the reasons why your prospective customers ‘will/will not’ see themselves using this product/solution that your company is providing.
Step 4Develop a ‘functional prototype’. To many this could be considered as ‘the most difficult and challenging step’ that you may encounter in your journey to raise capital. Transforming a pictorial prototype to a functional prototype is ‘not a cake walk’ as many would agree with me here. However, the intention is not for you to develop a full-fledged product, just try ‘develop that one unique feature of your idea’. Try to develop it by seeking help/support from your friends, friends-of-friends, anyone and everyone who could help you. If you can try to black box your product idea and get pieces of it done from different people. This is essential to protect the ‘Intellectual Property’ of the idea, bearing in mind ‘Ideas are no one’s monopoly’. You could also go for the signing of a ‘Non-Disclosure Agreement’ (with an anti-conflict clause) between yourself and the developers. Having said that, if you could develop the functional prototype on your own or with your partners, there is nothing better. But this is a ‘very tricky ground, so trade carefully’.
Step 5Customer acquisition (traction control). This is the next difficult and challenging step – ‘getting traction for your product’. In order for this, make use of all the weapons available in your arsenal. From ‘Facebook to Twitter to YouTube to sending out emails to writing blogs to newspaper articles (through connections) to TV (if you can afford) to partnering with other startups and having a launch party, etc.,’ spread the word around as much as you can. At this stage, the intention is to acquire your potential customers a good chunk of your total customer base. Sadly, however, even after all this, you were unable to acquire a good number of customers, don’t get dis-heartened, go back to the drawing board (Step 1) ‘re-evaluate, re-define, re-engineer, and re-start’. There is seldom any company who got everything right in the first instance. This step will challenge you ‘mentally, physically, and monetary wise’ so be prepared for it.
Step 6Monetising strategies. By now you would know for sure that your idea has legs and it has walked a long way on the on the ‘shoulders’ of your unique feature attracting customers. This means that now you can think of ‘developing a business model’ around your feature, which means identifying ways to generate income from your idea. This is the point from where your ‘idea moves along a continuum to become a business’. Herein you should be able to identify who your ‘primary, secondary, and tertiary stakeholders are’. Now these stakeholders will start to play a role in your business at different levels, impact of these stakeholders could be through, for example, fiscal policy, monetary policies, state regulations, excise, HR rules, and many more. Hence, it becomes important to account them into process of developing monetising strategies. In this step you work on monetising your concept looking at different parameters and negotiating your way through different obstacles (beyond your control) and still make profit out of it (if not profit at least breakeven). Upon implementing these strategies, you could procure some funds that would allow you to move on to the next step.
Step 7Scale your product/solution. By now you will have traction and cash coming into your bank account from the previous steps. So now it is time ‘to move beyond boundaries’ with the aim of spreading out your wings. In order to do that you will have to ‘scale up’ your product accommodate wider usage (e.g., server with large space, etc.). And by this step, stage is set for you to approach your potential investors with the right numbers knowing how much money you need, for what, where it has to be spent, and what would be the ROI of it. And like that a lot of factual answers to some obvious questions. SO the time is perfect to develop your pitch.
Step 8Create a pitch. This is the stretched out version of your elevator pitch developed in Step 1. Herein you could create a simple presentation describing the ‘product/ feature set’, results of your ‘market research’ (developed in the previous steps), highlighting the numbers coming out of the ‘traction levels’, ‘market size’ and where you ‘fit’ in the market. The ‘team’ behind (very important) investors not only invest on the idea but they need to be convinced that they could trust you and your team with their money, ‘business model or the monetising strategy’.
Step 9Finding the ‘Money’. Once you have developed your pitch, find investors using the local ‘Angel network’, through ‘LinkedIn’, approaching the local ‘University incubation center’, joining any ‘accelerator programme’, any ‘personal contact’, attending ‘Expo’s’ with your demos. You can also promote your product through various mediums waiting for it to catch the attention of potential investors but this is not very common.
Step 10Delivering the pitch. ‘Trust’ plays a big role in order for handover of money to happen. At this stage you would want the potential investors to trust you. When you are finally in front of the investors, try to showcase your sharpness, thoroughness, diligence, and intelligence. Prove it to them that you are someone they could trust. They don’t expect you to know everything. Before you head out to deliver your pitch be prepared to answer any kind question, running a mock interview would be a good idea here. It is quest so you may be directed from one person to the other, but finally you will reach the right person at the right time. This is the stage where you have only one purpose and that is to impress your potential investors. But again this is not going to be very straightforward, be prepared to ‘face rejections’ and you might have to do this with a number of investors before they go on to decide to ‘invest or syndicate with some else’ to invest in your firm, the ‘Eureka Moment’.
Step 11Refine your product. While undergoing the process of finding investments, ‘equal efforts’ have to be put in to constantly refine the product, adjusting it to the changing internal or external variables. In doing so you are increasing your chances to attract investment, investors will not fund projects, wherein their funds are being used for development or marketing, they would prefer to invest in a venture at the stage of scaling. In refining your product you could also be hitting the box of ‘innovation’ and allowing you stay in tune with the latest trend in the market.
Step 12‘LionHeart’. This is more to do with facing adversary and every time you fall or get rejected you dust it off and start all over again. Treat every rejection as a learning lesson. Every entrepreneur has faced rejection. The question is quoting Rocky Balboa here “It’s not how hard you can hit, but how hard you could get hit?” and stand back up.
These 12 steps is just a guide. There is no foolproof plan that will work every time and everywhere. What may have worked in one country may not work in another. But the intention is for all budding entrepreneurs to use this as a guide for your future endeavors.
source.. http://yourstory.com/2016/02/raising-funding-startup/

How Do I Start a Small Business?

Grow fast in startup, Growthhacking, start a business, startups, Uncategorized



1. Have an idea. It might be a product you’ve always wanted to make, or a service you feel people need. It might even be something people don’t know they need yet, because it hasn’t been invented!

  • It can be helpful—–and fun—–to have people who are bright and creative join you for a casual brainstorming session. Start with a simple question like: “what shall we build?”. The idea is not to create a business plan, just to generate some ideas. Many of the ideas will be duds, and there will be quite a few ordinary ones, but a few will emerge that have real potential.
2. Define your goals. Do you want financial independence, eventually selling your business to the highest bidder? Do you want something small and sustainable, that you love doing and want to derive a steady income from? These are the things that are good to know very early on.

3. Create a working name. You could even do this before you have an idea for the business, and if the name is good, you may find it helps you define your business idea. As your plan grows, and things begin to take shape, the perfect name may come to you, but don’t let that hinder you in the early phases—–create a name that you can use while you plan, and don’t mind changing later.
  • For a bit of fun, take a cue from the Beatles, who often use fun names for a song before it is finalized, like Yesterday, which had the working title of “Scrambled Eggs.”

4. Define your team. Will you do this alone, or will you bring in one or two trusted friends to join you? This brings a lot of synergy to the table, as people bounce ideas off each other. Two people together can often create something that is greater than the sum of the two separate parts.
  • Think of some of the biggest success stories in recent times include John Lennon and Paul McCartney; Bill Gates and Paul Allen; Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak; and Larry Page and Sergey Brin. In every case, the partnership brought out the best in both sides of the equation, and every one of them became billionaires. Is a partnership a guarantee of being a billionaire? No, but it doesn’t hurt!
5. Choose wisely. When choosing the person or people you’re going to build the business with, be careful. Even if someone is your best friend, it doesn’t mean that you will partner well in a business operation. Start it with a reliable person. Things to consider when choosing your co-leaders and support cast include:
  • Does the other person complement your weaknesses? Or do both of you bring only one set of the same skills to the table? If the latter, be wary as you can have too many cooks doing the same thing while other things are left unattended.
  • Do you see eye to eye on the big picture? Arguments about the details are a given, and are important for getting things right. But not seeing eye to eye on the big picture, the real purpose of your business can cause a split that may be irreparable. Be sure your team cares about the and buys into the purpose as much as you do.
  • If interviewing people, do some reading on how to spot real talent beyond the certifications, degrees or lack thereof. People’s innate talents can often be somewhat different from the conventional education streams they’ve pursued (or failed to) and it’s important to look for “click” (you get along with them) and latent talents as much as paper credentials
    .

Social Media Marketing: How to Grow Your Business Using Social Media

business, entrepreneurs, Grow fast in startup, start a business, startups, Uncategorized



This demonstrates a huge potential for social media marketing to increase sales, but a lack of understanding on how to achieve those results. Here’s a look at just some of the ways social media marketing can improve your business:


Does the thought of Social Media put you into a spin. What is Social Media Speak. Let me help you to enter this world of wonder and social marketing

1. Get your domain today.
  • Once you have a domain, you’ll need to buy hosting services and then begin to build your site. If you don’t know how to design a site, you can either hire a designer or use a site builder that offers pre-made templates through your host. No matter which method you choose, your site should include the following:
      1. Information about your company, product and opportunity
      2. A system for ordering your product or registering to operate a business
      3. Information about training and your support team
      4. A list of the advantages of joining your company and team
      5. The offer of a free e-book, document or newsletter if users give you their name and a valid e-mail
      6. An autoresponder that sends follow-up e-mails to everyone who provides their contact information. Make sure it can also send out newsletters.
2. Use blog/weblogs to your advantage.

  • You don’t have to be a penned wordsmith to be a good blogger. Blogging comes in many formats and the key is that blogging is conversational.
    • You can try traditionally penned blogs.
    • You can record audio tracks which is known as podcasting.
    • A third method is microblogging and a popular platform for this is twitter. In 140 characters or less microblogging allows you to engage prospects and carry out easy conversations.
  • Blogging is a critical component of social media marketing because it allows businesses to provide information through the use of fresh, relevant content.
  • Incorporating blogging as part of a company’s internet marketing strategy provides the company with a good opportunity to be found in the search engines for the company’s desired markets.
3. Create a network for your business online.
  • One of the most popular and highly addictive web 2.0 mediums for online consumers are the social networks.
  • Social networks allow consumers and business professionals to network among friends, strangers, acquaintances, and professionals all in one place.
  • If small businesses keep an open mind and keep their networks open they have the potential to grow their networks exponentially by allowing other consumers into their fold.
  • Social networks also allow businesses to update the public on new improvement in product lines, what an average day is like at xyz company. Social networks are varied in purpose and the amount of social networks can be mind numbing, but the most popular platforms determined by marketing research about consumer online behavior are currently LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.
  • It brings you closer to the people who require your website, products, and line of business the most and gives you information about experience and feedback’s of your target market. 
4. Syndicate your content from your business to your online site.

  • Social networks and blog platforms are relatively low on cost investment, but they are far from maintenance free marketing endeavors.
    • To blog and create viable weekly online content the time commitment involved is a minimum of 5-10 hours a week.
    • How can you effectively communicate online through providing fresh and relevant information AND then market that information to all of your contacts across all of the social networks? The answer is syndication.
  • Syndicating content allows your message and your information to be reached across the worldwide web. You can syndicate your content by using an online social service that will broadcast your updates across the social networks. You can also syndicate your marketing collateral by using a service that will syndicate your flyers across social networks.

 Marketing tactics you may want to try out include:

  • Free classifieds
  • Pay-per-click advertising
  • Paid banner advertising
  • Writing articles that include links to your website
  • Starting a blog
  • Participating in forums and newsgroups
  • Starting an e-mail newsletter



Seven tips and tricks to help grow your new venture

business, Grow fast in startup, start a business, startups, Uncategorized




Growing any business is a challenge. Growing a new business–which usually also means limited resources to invest–is many times more difficult.


Here are seven tips and tricks to help grow your new venture with no money.

Build relationships. Relationships matter and good ones may be the most important things to your new business. So go get some. Go to meetings, meetups, panel discussions at colleges and universities, drop by your chamber of commerce or industry association. These events and opportunities are almost always free and the people there are usually as eager to meet you as you are to meet them.
“Every new person you meet is a potential relationship that can last a life long. Think about how this person can be of value to other in your network and watch you network grow. The more deposits you make the greater the return.”  

Be valuable. Exchanging business cards isn’t enough. Don’t think about how someone you meet can help you–think first about how you can help them. Who do you already know that your new contact should meet? Do you know another event that could interest them? Giving value is valuable. Everyone wants to help people who help them and being valuable is the best, fastest and most genuine way to get value in return.
“To be truly considered valuable, it’s important to be known as a relationship broker and thought leader. This happens through actions not promises. If you are consistently connecting people to relevant contacts and information on a weekly basis to help them achieve their goals, especially when they don’t ask for help, then you will receive similar value from the right individuals in your network in due time.”  

Think out loud. Thought leadership (sharing your ideas about your business, market, trends or most anything) helps spread your name and makes it easier for the public to understand you and what you do.  You can post in comment sections on industry publications, for example. If you read an interesting news or opinion article, draft a response and send it in–many publications will share your well-reasoned and well-written views. And you can always start your own blog or get a free blogging site on places such as Blogger.

Make something free. People love free stuff. If you have a blog, offer free publicity. If you’re a consultant, offer a free initial review. Give away a free trial on your business software site. Meeting people, regardless of how or why they come to you, is an opportunity to build relationships. And giving away free things can, if done right, spark a good marketing and press opportunity.
“Customers tend to gravitate towards companies that are generous with information and support up front,”
“Pre-customer service can be a valuable asset to any business.”

Keep stats. As your business grows, if you count it, record it. You never know what information in your hands today will be important to your decision-making tomorrow. If you’re scoring website hits when you post to an industry blog, that’s good to know.

“Identify the numbers actually matter and becoming intimate with what drives those metrics north or south.” 

Be patient. Rome, as they used to say, wasn’t built in a day. If you decide to invest your time in a tactic–thought leadership for example–don’t change course immediately if you don’t see results. These things take time and build on one another. Once you’ve made a decision, make sure you give it more than enough time to work before you go in another direction.

Search, copy, paste. Find out what other leaders and businesses have done to be successful. Then copy and paste. You don’t need to be a detective–often times, you can simply ask. As long as they are not a competitor, people are usually happy to share successes and advice. And when you find a trick or tactic that seems to have worked, try it.

Don’t be too proud to adapt a good idea to your businesses.

That’s seven. What else do you suggest? Follow tip number three and leave your ideas in the comments section.

Five Experts, Five Tips For Business Success

business, entrepreneurs, forbes, Grow fast in startup, start a business, startups, Uncategorized

Below, gain five tips from five industry leading experts on how to make 2015 your best year yet.

1. Treat customers like guests in your home. 
While there will always be customers who have decreased attention, are in a hurry, or appear to be frazzled, you want to still aim to deliver strong customer care despite customer scenarios. One way to do this is to treat customers as if they are guests in your home.”
Kirt Manecke, customer service expert and author of the book “Smile: Sell More with Amazing Customer Service” 
2. Belong to at least three professional organizations. 
I always suggest to business owners that they belong to at least three professional assocations. First, you should belong to your local Chamber of Commerce or downtown business association. That is where you business is and where your employees often live. Moreover, you should belong to your specific industry trade association. And last, you should belong to a statewide association because most legislation happens at state level, and you need eyes and ears looking out for you business. In most cases, a retail association will fill that role.”
Curtis Picard, Executive Director of the Retail Association of Maine
3. Participate in e-commerce. 
The future of e-commerce belongs to small businesses. This is the biggest opportunity for retailers since farmer’s markets began hundreds of years ago.People often believe setting up an online store is expensive and difficult, but this is not the case.”
Harley Finkelstein, Chief Platform Officer at Shopify.com
4. Introduce commerce and charity. 
Research shows that 83 percent of customers want to buy products that benefit a cause. Combining your business with a charity of your choice is a great way to gain consumer attention while increasing sales.”
Dan McCabe, Director of SixDegrees.org
5. Embrace the cloud. 
The cloud is here to stay and Windows is dead. Over the next three to five years, the cloud will really come of age for small businesses, and Windows-based POS (point of sale) and other opersations will disappear. Retailers and small businesses must think about upgrading their technology – with cloud being the obvious choice.”

Warning Signs That Your Business Partnership Is Failing

business, Business Partners, entrepreneurs, Grow fast in startup, start a business, Uncategorized



You need to read these steps for good health of partnership. Because, A business partnership can be every bit as complicated as a marriage. And, like matrimony, some partnerships end unhappily.

Wouldn’t it be helpful if you could spot the warning signs of
an implosion before it occurred — or, better yet, before you even entered the partnership? That way, you could escape the situation before it turned ugly, got expensive, or wrecked what you’d built through long, hard work.
Actually, you can. Here are five signs that your shared business may be in trouble, so that perhaps you can rethink the partnership before it’s too late.
1. Unfair or Unbalanced Roles
Like a good marriage, a good business partnership brings together two people whose personalities, skill sets, intelligence, know-how, and other attributes complement each other. When properly balanced, the partnership produces a union that’s more powerful than either person acting alone.
But a successful partnership can’t happen or endure when there’s a fundamental imbalance. Trouble generally arises when one partner feels he or she has too much or too little:
  • authority,
  • responsibility,
  • time commitments, or
  • investment in a desired outcome.
The ideal situation is one in which each partner feels good about his or her contributions and the other partner’s efforts.
Of course, the requirements of a business are constantly shifting. So, a successful partnership needs not only an initial balance, but also a mechanism for re-balancing the partners’ individual workloads as often as necessary.
2. Financial Disagreements
Business is closely tied to money, and it involves making myriad decisions about spending, investing, receiving, and controlling funds. Some of these decisions inevitably are based on value judgements, such as whether you spend more in order to buy domestically-made goods or operate in a “green” way.

Spending much money without asking to your partners, hidden transactions, hiding clients payments etc. These are major issue in financial disagreement. 

Because
cash flow is central to your business, significant disagreements about spending signal a fundamental partnership problem. As time goes on, there’s a good chance you will become dissatisfied with your partner’s preferences regarding money — and tire of your constant tussling over it.
3. Unresolved Issues
This is not important to see the world in same way as other partners do. May be there some likes and dislikes, agreed or not. Problem is to resolve them by talking much more about the issue.

Disagreements are not necessarily a problem, but difficulties in resolving disagreements are. Psychologically, the inability to resolve conflicts often signals basic incompatibilities in a partnership, personal dislike, or divergent worldviews and values. But even if all that stays in the subconscious background, difficulty resolving disagreements generally reflects important differences in communication styles, priorities, and personal flexibility, any of which can put extra pressure on a relationship.

From a business perspective, disagreements that continue for long periods produce resentment, waste time, and impede effective management of the business. So, make every effort to settle disagreements respectfully, in a way that recognizes the worthwhile aspects of each partner’s point of view. Ongoing friction is usually a sign the partnership will end badly.
4. Different Ways of Working
Differences in work styles can produce conflicts and resentments that steadily build up until the partnership falls apart. For example, one partner may:
  • rarely or never take time off, while the other partner cherishes regular “off hours”;
  • obsess over certain issues, while the other partner thinks them through to a suitable policy and moves on; or,
  • insist on volunteering their services for certain causes or decline certain business opportunities in order to reinforce personal values that the other partner deems irrelevant to the business.
The partners may begin with a good deal of tolerance for each other’s “quirks.” But fundamental differences are likely to chip away at even the strongest bonds.
5. Different Exit Strategies
How you plan to exit the business in the future can have a profound impact on day-to-day decisions and operating strategies. If partners are interested in divergent outcomes, they’re frequently going to feel driven toward different choices, such as:
  • taking cash out of the business early versus delaying immediate income in favor of investment toward long-term growth; or
  • running everything personally based on “gut feelings” vs. establishing policies and developing staff so that the business can run without the partners’ close oversight.
Individually, none of these differences create an immediate or inevitably fatal flaw in a partnership, of course. But they do send up a red flag in terms of the potential for long-term mutual satisfaction and success in the partnership, and the greater number of these problems that describes your partnership, the bigger the risk tends to be.

Employee and Employer Relations

Employee Relation, Employer Relations, entrepreneurs, Grow fast in startup, start a business, startups, Uncategorized



It’s no secret that when a new employee comes on board, the employer who hired them is effectively beginning a new relationship.

It is the same relationship that he or she shares with every single one of their employees, and it is this relationship that will determine the success and impact of that employee’s time at the company.
An employer’s relationship with their employees has to be nurtured and taken care of in order to be beneficial for both individuals; their co-workers, and the company as a whole. It has long been noted that strong employer-employee relationships often lead to greater employee happiness and significantly improved productivity.
Many typical employer-employee relationships will vary on the scale of closeness and familiarity, but it is essential that all employer-employee relationships involve at least these five major characteristics.

1. Mutual respect

It’s perfectly fine to instigate a closer relationship with your employees to the point of socializing with them outside of work. (This is particularly common in smaller businesses and start-ups).
But even in a relaxed workplace, it is crucial to retain the traditional hierarchal structure and encourage awareness of this in your employees. As a leader, you need to be ready to give your team honest and frank feedback, whether this is  about projects, employee appraisals, or constructive criticism.
Romantic relationships in the workplace are always a bad idea, but you should also bear in mind that these relationships can have an effect on the workplace even before they are public or common knowledge — possibly without either party knowing it.  

2. Mutual reliance

There should be a balanced amount of reliance on both employer and employee. The employer relies on the employee to do his or her job well for the benefit of the business; the employee relies on the employer to treat them fairly and pay them equitably.
When this mutual reliance becomes imbalanced or one-way, problems will inevitably occur.
The employer may start to feel that the employee’s efforts are no longer instrumental to the company and view them as disposable, while the employee may no longer value their job and start to become disengaged. When either of these things happens, it’s time for the employer to reevaluate the employee’s role at the company – whether a new agreement can be reached, or whether it’s time to part ways.

3. Openness & communication

Any healthy working environment involves openness and transparency.
Employers can help create a forum of openness and honesty by asking employees candidly about their lives, families, and interests. Employees can, in return, contribute to this setting by being forthcoming about their lives outside of work.
Openness and communication is even more important for situations sensitive to the company, or that require an otherwise serious approach.
For employees, this might mean informing their boss of a family emergency that could affect their performance, or a desire to find a new job. When it comes to the latter, employers shouldn’t deter their employees from leaving, but should be understanding and supportive of their natural want to progress.
Meanwhile, employers should keep their employees in the loop about business matters and seek their input in important company decisions. Not allowing your employees to have an active role in the growth of the company not only wastes valuable insight and energy, but may also encourage them to become disengaged.

4. Support (and nurturing)

Employers should want their employees to reach their full potential and recognize when their capabilities exceed their current role. Leaving natural abilities to stagnate will cause boredom and frustration to grow in the employee, and as mentioned earlier, waste valuable energy that could better help the team.
Draw up your ideal business structure, or your current business structure as it is now, and outline every role and position that is necessary for it to work effectively. Not only will this enable you to identify gaps in your current team, it will also encourage you to take stock of who is performing well and who might be better off in a role with more authority.
Supporting employees even extends as far as helping them spread their wings and fly away to a new job when the time comes. Employers ought to be invested in their employees’ success as a whole and understand that they may not be at the company forever.
Employers have the option to help employees or to stifle them — but only the former will lead to trust, higher skill levels, more productivity and more motivation.
On the other hand, employees should be willing to show support for the company’s welfare and progress, which may mean making sacrifices from time to time. Whether it’s working late to fix an unexpected problem, or covering somebody else’s duties as well as their own, employees need to be ready to show that they are invested in the success of the company.

5. Gratitude

Gratitude should exist on both sides of the relationship, but it is probably a larger responsibility of the employer to recognize and appreciate exceptional effort from their employees.
When employees consistently deliver and receive little or no appreciation, it can become very easy for them to become disheartened, frustrated, and apathetic about their job, which destroys productivity.
A simple thank you is often enough (and this works both ways), but employers may wish to actively reward their employees for truly great work. They should use their intuition and knowledge of the person to decide what this might be.
In some cases a discreet gift might be enough, while others might relish recognition in the office. Some companies even host annual awards ceremonies where outstanding employees are given public recognition for their achievements.
Overall, gratitude and recognition help to ensure that employees know they are valued and that good actions and efforts are repeated.

Final note

It is simply not enough to draw up an office code of conduct, or a set of rules or policies detailing the ideal dynamics of the employer-employee relationship.
Natural habits are formed only in practice, and it is often through leading by example that employers can hope to encourage these practices.

Grow Your Business Tips

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  • Always provide value and service to those who may be your customers, even if they are not currently. When they do need your product, you want them to think of you first.
  • With the advent of the internet, online businesses are probably the easiest way to start and very much less expensive in terms of start-up cost than an offline counterpart.
  • Keep learning, and be adaptable to change. Find buddies, mentors, local business-related organizations, Internet forums, and wikis to discuss the daily details of running a small business. It’s much easier for everyone to perform their core businesses well and prosper when they don’t waste time and energy “reinventing the wheel” on housekeeping.
  • A franchise is a great idea although the start-up capital is way too high for most people.
  • Most direct selling companies have low start up capital compared to a traditional brick and mortar business. You can also break even rather quickly compared to the traditional business.
  • You can also consider trading on eBay or Flipkart, Snapdeal.
  • It is ok to start small with one or two products and then add more and more great ideas as you go!
  • Don’t be afraid to experiment with prices. You should determine the minimum price for your product or service to break even, but experiment with low-price or premium-price variations.

Launching Your Business – How to start small business – Part 6

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Launching Your Business

1. Secure space. Whether it’s an office, or a warehouse, if you need more space than your garage or your spare bedroom, now’s the time to get that.

  • If you don’t generally need an office beyond your home, but may occasionally need meeting space, there are often places downtown that can address those needs. A quick Google search on “business meeting rentals [your city/state]” will deliver plenty of rental options in your area.
2. Build your product or develop your service. Once you have the business all planned, financed, and have your basic level of staffing, get going. Whether that’s sitting down with the engineers and getting the software coded and tested, or getting materials sourced and shipped to your fabrication room (aka “garage”), or purchasing in bulk and marking up the price, the building process is the time during which you prepare for market. During this time, you may discover things such as:

  • Needing to tweak the ideas. Perhaps the product needs to be a different color, texture or size. Maybe your services need to be broader, narrower or more detailed. This is the time to attend to anything that crops up during your testing and development phases. You’ll know innately when something needs tweaking to make it better or to make it less like a competitor’s stale offerings.
  • Getting feedback. Friends and family make great resources for asking questions and getting feedback––don’t hesitate to use them as your sounding board.
  • Needing to increase the size of your premises. This happens more often than expected. Once the stock starts piling up, you may find it ends up in your living room, bedroom and the garden shed. Think rental of storage premises if needed.

3. Launch your product or your service. When the product is all built, packaged, coded, online, and ready to sell, or when your services are fully worked out and ready to go, hold a special event to launch your business. Send out a press release, announce it to the world. Tweet it, Facebook it, let the word resound to all corners of your market—you have a new business!

  • Hold a party and invite people who can spread the word for you. It doesn’t need to be pricey––purchase the food and drink from bulk discount stores and get family and friends to help with catering (you can give them a product or service in return).