Dream Big with Big team

business, startups, Success, Uncategorized
What is the most important thing to build a successful company?
5 things that help


1. Find passionated personality.

Forget about the CV, whatever they mention in it. Look what they achieved, what they did amazing. Do they have focus on life, why they are doing. Is they hungry for the work? If yes, select this person.

2. Don’t hire someone from big position.

Sometime you think to hire a multinational guy, he will come and help you with their idea and some money, But this is not help you. They will always try to force their idea’s on your business.
So, find a new guy from lower position, that guy will feel challenged and make more effort.

3. Keep recruiting

Don’t stop recruitment, look at this point.. if guy is beneficial, Catch them. Ask everyone, if they know someone who can help and work for your company and make list of their contact number and skills.
That will also help when ever you want to find a guy urgently, you can contact that person and can offer more than he getting paid.

4. Are you enjoying?

We always feel that work and personal life are separate things but this is not. The people with their vision, they will make your vision too. Partying with them, going out, traveling together, talking about funniest things make your bond stronger.

5. Dream big with a big team

If you are dreaming big, you must have a big team to do the right things oprated by yourself.
Fill the effort of yours, your dream, your vision to all team members. That will make you successful as you want.

12 steps to raise capital for your startup

business, Grow fast in startup, Uncategorized
Step 1It always starts with an ‘Idea’. Having an idea is not enough to attract funds. You will need to dig deep into your idea, breaking your idea into parts with the intention to identify what is ‘unique’ about it. What solution are you providing and to what problem? You will have to find out what is your ‘Most Unique Feature’ that helps you stand out from others. Once you have identified it, try to define it in a couple of words and that becomes yourUnique Selling Point’. Use this to develop your elevator pitch, starting what is the problem, what is your solution and how is it unique? All summed up in less than a minute.
Step 2Transform words to a prototype. Now that you are able to define your USP, try to develop a prototype’ around it. When I say prototype, it is not necessary that it has to be a finished product sample. You could take that unique feature of yours and put it into a PowerPoint, Photoshop, or draw it out on a piece of paper, so that you could show it to your potential investors. Investors like to see things that are‘tangible’. And also you could develop a ‘small animated video’ about how your product and the key feature of it ‘works out’ to be (could be as simple as a ‘flowchart’).
Step 3Take an outside perspective (sampling). Once you have your prototype, see if you can ‘test it/do a bit of reconnaissance’, which means go out see what others have to say about your prototype. When I say others focus on your ‘prospective customers’. Take a ‘good proportionate and a representative sample’ of it and try to ‘record’ their experience, this will help you in developing a market research report, that will come handy later on. During this step, see whether your customers are able to make head or tail of it. Also try to identify the reasons why your prospective customers ‘will/will not’ see themselves using this product/solution that your company is providing.
Step 4Develop a ‘functional prototype’. To many this could be considered as ‘the most difficult and challenging step’ that you may encounter in your journey to raise capital. Transforming a pictorial prototype to a functional prototype is ‘not a cake walk’ as many would agree with me here. However, the intention is not for you to develop a full-fledged product, just try ‘develop that one unique feature of your idea’. Try to develop it by seeking help/support from your friends, friends-of-friends, anyone and everyone who could help you. If you can try to black box your product idea and get pieces of it done from different people. This is essential to protect the ‘Intellectual Property’ of the idea, bearing in mind ‘Ideas are no one’s monopoly’. You could also go for the signing of a ‘Non-Disclosure Agreement’ (with an anti-conflict clause) between yourself and the developers. Having said that, if you could develop the functional prototype on your own or with your partners, there is nothing better. But this is a ‘very tricky ground, so trade carefully’.
Step 5Customer acquisition (traction control). This is the next difficult and challenging step – ‘getting traction for your product’. In order for this, make use of all the weapons available in your arsenal. From ‘Facebook to Twitter to YouTube to sending out emails to writing blogs to newspaper articles (through connections) to TV (if you can afford) to partnering with other startups and having a launch party, etc.,’ spread the word around as much as you can. At this stage, the intention is to acquire your potential customers a good chunk of your total customer base. Sadly, however, even after all this, you were unable to acquire a good number of customers, don’t get dis-heartened, go back to the drawing board (Step 1) ‘re-evaluate, re-define, re-engineer, and re-start’. There is seldom any company who got everything right in the first instance. This step will challenge you ‘mentally, physically, and monetary wise’ so be prepared for it.
Step 6Monetising strategies. By now you would know for sure that your idea has legs and it has walked a long way on the on the ‘shoulders’ of your unique feature attracting customers. This means that now you can think of ‘developing a business model’ around your feature, which means identifying ways to generate income from your idea. This is the point from where your ‘idea moves along a continuum to become a business’. Herein you should be able to identify who your ‘primary, secondary, and tertiary stakeholders are’. Now these stakeholders will start to play a role in your business at different levels, impact of these stakeholders could be through, for example, fiscal policy, monetary policies, state regulations, excise, HR rules, and many more. Hence, it becomes important to account them into process of developing monetising strategies. In this step you work on monetising your concept looking at different parameters and negotiating your way through different obstacles (beyond your control) and still make profit out of it (if not profit at least breakeven). Upon implementing these strategies, you could procure some funds that would allow you to move on to the next step.
Step 7Scale your product/solution. By now you will have traction and cash coming into your bank account from the previous steps. So now it is time ‘to move beyond boundaries’ with the aim of spreading out your wings. In order to do that you will have to ‘scale up’ your product accommodate wider usage (e.g., server with large space, etc.). And by this step, stage is set for you to approach your potential investors with the right numbers knowing how much money you need, for what, where it has to be spent, and what would be the ROI of it. And like that a lot of factual answers to some obvious questions. SO the time is perfect to develop your pitch.
Step 8Create a pitch. This is the stretched out version of your elevator pitch developed in Step 1. Herein you could create a simple presentation describing the ‘product/ feature set’, results of your ‘market research’ (developed in the previous steps), highlighting the numbers coming out of the ‘traction levels’, ‘market size’ and where you ‘fit’ in the market. The ‘team’ behind (very important) investors not only invest on the idea but they need to be convinced that they could trust you and your team with their money, ‘business model or the monetising strategy’.
Step 9Finding the ‘Money’. Once you have developed your pitch, find investors using the local ‘Angel network’, through ‘LinkedIn’, approaching the local ‘University incubation center’, joining any ‘accelerator programme’, any ‘personal contact’, attending ‘Expo’s’ with your demos. You can also promote your product through various mediums waiting for it to catch the attention of potential investors but this is not very common.
Step 10Delivering the pitch. ‘Trust’ plays a big role in order for handover of money to happen. At this stage you would want the potential investors to trust you. When you are finally in front of the investors, try to showcase your sharpness, thoroughness, diligence, and intelligence. Prove it to them that you are someone they could trust. They don’t expect you to know everything. Before you head out to deliver your pitch be prepared to answer any kind question, running a mock interview would be a good idea here. It is quest so you may be directed from one person to the other, but finally you will reach the right person at the right time. This is the stage where you have only one purpose and that is to impress your potential investors. But again this is not going to be very straightforward, be prepared to ‘face rejections’ and you might have to do this with a number of investors before they go on to decide to ‘invest or syndicate with some else’ to invest in your firm, the ‘Eureka Moment’.
Step 11Refine your product. While undergoing the process of finding investments, ‘equal efforts’ have to be put in to constantly refine the product, adjusting it to the changing internal or external variables. In doing so you are increasing your chances to attract investment, investors will not fund projects, wherein their funds are being used for development or marketing, they would prefer to invest in a venture at the stage of scaling. In refining your product you could also be hitting the box of ‘innovation’ and allowing you stay in tune with the latest trend in the market.
Step 12‘LionHeart’. This is more to do with facing adversary and every time you fall or get rejected you dust it off and start all over again. Treat every rejection as a learning lesson. Every entrepreneur has faced rejection. The question is quoting Rocky Balboa here “It’s not how hard you can hit, but how hard you could get hit?” and stand back up.
These 12 steps is just a guide. There is no foolproof plan that will work every time and everywhere. What may have worked in one country may not work in another. But the intention is for all budding entrepreneurs to use this as a guide for your future endeavors.
source.. http://yourstory.com/2016/02/raising-funding-startup/

Multitasking is a bad idea?

business, Business Ideas, Uncategorized

You know that multitasking is a bad idea. You may even know that frequent multitasking shrinks your brain and lowers your IQ. But did you know that, far from saving you time, multitasking cuts your productivity by a whopping 40 percent?

That frightening number comes from Devora Zack, CEO of Only Connect Consulting, and author most recently of Singletasking: Get More Done–One Thing at a Time. In fact, she notes, there’s actually no such thing as multitasking. You may think you’re taking part in a conference call, writing a report, and texting with your spouse all at the same time, but what your brain is actually doing is switching non-stop among these different activities. That’s costing you both efficiency and brain cells.
The problem is, like many things, multitasking may be bad for you but it feels really good. That’s because as you switch from task to task, your brain reacts to the feeling of newness with a jolt of dopamine–the same brain chemical that causes heroin addiction.
Fortunately, Zack says, you can get off the multitasking treadmill, and regain your efficiency, not to mention the IQ points you may have lost. Here’s how.

1. Choose one task and commit to it.

“Singletasking obliges you to do one thing at a time, excluding any other demands at that moment,” Zack says. “This means you must stand firm and genuinely commit to your choices.”
This doesn’t mean that you need to stick with a single task until it is completed, she adds–few of us have the scheduling freedom for that. What she does suggest is picking a specific amount of time to work on a given task and sticking to it for that much time.
I believe that approach is the power of the highly popular Pomodoro Technique, in which you work on a given task for 25 minutes at a time (one “pomodoro”) and then take a five-minute break. Whether you use pomodoros or not, focusing on one task at a time is a highly powerful thing to do, especially if you’ve got a tough job to complete.

2. Pick a place to park distracting inspirations.

You know what I mean. You’re in the middle of writing an email to a client and suddenly a bright idea for how to pitch another client pops into your head. If you’re a multitasker, your response us to open a new email and start writing that second pitch while it’s fresh in your mind.
The wiser approach is to designate a handy place to leave notes to yourself so that you don’t lose your brilliant ideas and can come back to them later while keeping your focus on the task at hand. Ideally, you should quickly switch to a different screen (or pull out a nearby notepad), jot down a few words or a sentence that will help you remember your bright idea, and then go right back to what you were doing. Zack uses her smartphone for this purpose; I use Evernote. Whatever method you choose, it should be quick, near to hand, intuitive for you, and as brief an interruption as possible.

3. Give yourself the gift of distraction-free time.

“It’s up to you to control your environment–to ‘build fences’ to keep potential distractions, such as noise and pop-ups, at bay,” Zack says. It’s easy to blame your co-workers (or the people you live with, if you work at home) when they distract you. It’s also easy to blame your technology for distracting you–the incoming email or Facebook notification that bings or buzzes, the incoming phone call or text.
The fact is, being distracted or not is mostly within your control. If you have an office with a door, close that door during conference calls, while working on projects, and other times you need want to focus on a single task (which should be most of the time). If you work in a cubicle or your office has an open floor plan, use a sticky note or some other means to signal that you don’t want to be disturbed right now. And you can block calls, texts, and other such distractions by closing your email window and silencing your phone’s notifications.

4. Perform related tasks in clusters.

Answering email messages, texts, and social media messages as they arrive is a great way to abandon your focus and get that addictive dopamine craving filled. Resist the temptation by relegating certain tasks to certain periods or times of the day. For instance, you might limit reading and answering email to three times: when you start work in the morning, at lunch time, and right before you stop for the day, Zack suggests. That way, email won’t interrupt you the rest of the time.
It’s also smart to cluster tasks by topic because that will help you increase focus. You may be receiving email about many different projects or sales opportunities. If you respond to them project by project, instead of in the order they arrive, you’ll be able to focus better on each overall topic.

5. Grow your attention span with a little quiet time.

The average human attention span is eight seconds, Zack says. “This is one second less than the attention span of a goldfish,” she notes. One reason is that modern humans can satisfy our own desire for distraction every waking moment and are never alone with our thoughts.
So fight that tendency by scheduling a few minutes of introspective quiet time into your daily or weekly routine. Formal meditation is one way to achieve this, but so is this simple five-minute exercise. Just giving yourself a few minutes to daydream works too.

6. Become a master at saying no.

None of us like saying no, and all of us like to think we can take on one more project, one more volunteer task, one more social engagement. But that’s a recipe for disaster, Zack warns. Instead, she says, we must learn to say no gracefully.
“It’s perfectly fine, even responsible, not to respond to every request immediately,” she says. And saying no doesn’t make you selfish. “‘No, I can’t right now,’ is not equivalent to ‘No I won’t ever do it,'” she adds. “What you’re really saying is that, just as you’re committed to your current obligation, you’ll be equally committed to their request when the time comes.” (And if you’re wondering which tasks to say no to, this approach to streamlining may help.)

7. Ask the people around you to hold you accountable for focusing.

“Old habits die hard,” Zack notes. “From time to time, you’ll almost certainly go back to your old ways, reverting to task-switching. So ask your family, friends, and co-workers to call you out.”
Not only will this help keep you honest about focusing on one task at a time; it will have extra benefits as well. If the people in your life understand that you’re trying to build focus–and that you want their help in that effort–they’ll be in your corner to help make that happen. Besides holding you to your no-distraction plan, they may look for ways to keep distractions from reaching you. They may even think twice before distracting you themselves.
source Inc

12 Leading Reasons of Business Failures

business, Business Fails, Business Ideas, start a business, Uncategorized




According to Business Survey.  magazine, 33% of all new businesses fail within the first six months. Fifty percent of new businesses fail within their first two years of operation and 75% fail within the first three years.


Here are the leading reasons of business failures.

1. No Business Plan


You‘ve heard the old saying “If you don’t know where you are going, how will you get there?” 

Too many business owners start their business without a plan. They simply “open their doors” for business and then expect to succeed. 

Before starting your business, take the time to develop a Business Plan. 

Your plan will identify what you want your business to accomplish (where you want to go) and the strategies that you will utilize (how you will get there).

(For tips on how to how to write a Business Plan, see the article entitled “How to Write an Effective Business Plan” in this section)

2. Under Funded 


Many businesses fail within the first few months, because the owner runs out of money. 

When starting any business, you will need money for all of your start up costs as well as money to sustain the business for the first few months of operation (until cash flow from operations is positive). 

Running out of money is a result of poor planning. A properly developed Business Plan will tell you exactly how much money you require for start up expenditures and to operate the business until cash flow is positive.

A business owner should develop Income Statements and Cash Flow Statements for the first two years of operations. That will tell you whether or not you have sufficient funds to sustain the business until it is profitable. 

3. Lack of Operating Goals and Objectives


Many business owners create a Business Plan to obtain a loan. Once they receive their funding, they put their plan “on the shelf” and do nothing further with it. 

While it is important to have a Business Plan, it is also very important to have specific goals and objectives for the first twelve months of operations.

In your planning process, create goals and objectives for your business. Break down goals and objectives by quarter – in other words, identify all of the things that must be done during the first quarter, the second quarter, the third quarter and the fourth. 

Examples of specific goals could be for each month; revenue objectives, profit objectives, numbers of new customers, specific marketing and operational activities, etc.

4. Failure to Measure Goals and Objectives


All too often, once a business starts operating, the owner becomes too immersed in the ongoing daily activities to take the necessary time to assess the progress of the business. 

It is fine to establish operational goals and objectives, but you also have to measure how well your business is performing against those goals and objectives.

Measuring against the identified goals and objectives will tell the owner whether or not modifications and alternate strategies are required.

5. Failure to Pay Attention to Cash Flow


There is an old saying in business “Cash is King”. In the early months of your new business, monitoring cash flow is extremely important. 

It is really as simple as this: if you continue to spend more money than you bring in, you will soon be out of business. 

Cash flow is all of the money that you take in each month minus all of your expenditures. 

Cash inflow is cash sales and accounts receivables collected. 

Cash outflow is all monies paid for inventory purchases and operating expenses (rent, heat, hydro, salaries, marketing expenditures, etc.).

It is not uncommon for most businesses to have a negative cash flow for the first several months of operation (in some businesses this may be for more than a year). 

However, at a point in time, the cash from revenues will exceed expenditures and the business will be in a positive cash flow position. Every new business owner has to ensure that he / she has preserved enough cash to reach this point.

6. Failure to Understand the Industry and the Target Customer


Some business owners start their businesses before fully investigating the industry. 

What are the trends in your industry – is it growing or declining? What are the opportunities and what are the threats? Where can you position your business in this industry in order that your business will succeed? Will new technologies have an impact on your industry?

If you have not taken the time to understand your industry, you could be entering a “sunset industry”. 

I have worked with two companies that had to reinvent themselves because they were both in “sunset industries” due to changes in technology. One was a manufacturer of computer printer ribbons for dot matrix printers. This was a very good industry until the introduction of laser and ink jet printers. People stopped buying dot matrix printers and the demand for printer ribbons declined significantly. The other company was a cheque printing company. Due to electronic payments, the usage of cheques declined significantly.

Some business owners open their doors for business without taking the time to understand their target customers (buyer demographics and psychographics, how they buy, what they buy, when they buy, what motivates them to buy and where they buy). 

Do not expect that just because you are now in business, that customers will flock to your door. If you do not understand your target customer, how do expect to effectively reach them? 

7. No Means of Differentiation – Just Another “Me Too” Business


Many businesses have failed because they are just another “me too” business. 

Customers need a reason to come to, or to want to do business with your company. 

If your products or services are the same quality and prices as your competitor(s), why will people buy from you? They already have an existing supplier.

If however, you can offer a different or better product / service (better quality, lower prices, broader selection, faster delivery, better location, extended warranty, etc.), prospective customers will want to do business with your company.

Every business owner must objectively ask this question “If I were a customer, why would I want to do business with this (my) company?” If you cannot identify two good reasons, then rethink your positioning and your strategies.

8. Poor or No Marketing Programs in Which to Attract New Customers


Just because you have opened your doors for business, that does not mean that customers will beat a path to it. 

You have to announce to prospective customers that (a) you are open for business and (b) why they should want to deal with you.

By understanding the demographics and psychographics of your target customers, you can identify how to best reach them. 

There are numerous ways in which you can market your business. Some of the more common are: 

Advertisements (newspapers, magazines, radio, television, yellow pages, value packs); billboards; brochures (electronic and printed); cross marketing / cross promotions; direct mail; fax (broadcast or personalized); networking; newsletters; postcards; posters; promotional items; public speaking; referrals; sales calls (cold calls, scheduled calls); sales letters; seminars & workshops; signs (interior and exterior); targeted e-mail; telemarketing; telephone on hold messages; trade shows; website.

In order to ensure that your business succeeds, in the first few months you will have to implement marketing programs that get the attention of, and appeal to the needs of your target customers.

9. Underestimating the Competition


Some business owners underestimate the reaction of the competition when they start their businesses. 

Any owner of an existing business that perceives that a new entrant to the industry will be taking away some of their customers, will aggressively take steps to defend their customer base. 

They could do this by lowering prices, offering package / bundle pricing, extending terms, introducing new products, improving product quality, extending warranties, increasing marketing activities, etc.

Do no underestimate the competitive reactions to the start of your business. You may find yourself in an extended competitive “war”. 

10. Not Cost Competitive


Before starting your business, attempt to obtain information about and to understand the cost structure(s) and selling prices of your competitors. 

You may find that your competitors have lower operating costs than you. Your overhead may be too high. Your manufacturing processes may not be as efficient. 

If your selling prices are the same as your competitors and their operating costs are lower, their margins will be higher. If that is the case and you get into a protracted price war with a competitor, you will not survive. 

You will have to find ways to reduce the cost disparity if you plan to last in this industry. The lowest cost producer will always win a price war. 

11. Lack of Attention to Accounts Receivables and Inventory


Some businesses owners do not pay attention to their receivables and their inventories. Accounts receivable and inventory can suck cash from a business. 

If customers are not paying you, or are not paying you on time, they are using your money. 

If you have excess inventory or slow moving or obsolete inventory, you have your money tied up in products that are of little or no use to your business.

Just as you should be monitoring the cash in the bank, you should also be carefully watching accounts receivables and inventory levels. 

12. Poor People Management Skills


Many companies state that their employees are their most important asset. 

Frequently customers do business with an organization because they like the people that they deal with in that company. 

If you do not treat your people fairly and with respect, you may have a constant turnover of employees. 

After a while, due to constant turnover, customers may become wary about dealing with your company. 

If your business requires employees with unique skill sets, it may become difficult to find acceptable replacements. If that is the case, quality and output may suffer leading to customer dissatisfaction and a decline in your business.

Treat your employees well and they will enthusiastically help to grow your business.

Social Media Marketing: How to Grow Your Business Using Social Media

business, entrepreneurs, Grow fast in startup, start a business, startups, Uncategorized



This demonstrates a huge potential for social media marketing to increase sales, but a lack of understanding on how to achieve those results. Here’s a look at just some of the ways social media marketing can improve your business:


Does the thought of Social Media put you into a spin. What is Social Media Speak. Let me help you to enter this world of wonder and social marketing

1. Get your domain today.
  • Once you have a domain, you’ll need to buy hosting services and then begin to build your site. If you don’t know how to design a site, you can either hire a designer or use a site builder that offers pre-made templates through your host. No matter which method you choose, your site should include the following:
      1. Information about your company, product and opportunity
      2. A system for ordering your product or registering to operate a business
      3. Information about training and your support team
      4. A list of the advantages of joining your company and team
      5. The offer of a free e-book, document or newsletter if users give you their name and a valid e-mail
      6. An autoresponder that sends follow-up e-mails to everyone who provides their contact information. Make sure it can also send out newsletters.
2. Use blog/weblogs to your advantage.

  • You don’t have to be a penned wordsmith to be a good blogger. Blogging comes in many formats and the key is that blogging is conversational.
    • You can try traditionally penned blogs.
    • You can record audio tracks which is known as podcasting.
    • A third method is microblogging and a popular platform for this is twitter. In 140 characters or less microblogging allows you to engage prospects and carry out easy conversations.
  • Blogging is a critical component of social media marketing because it allows businesses to provide information through the use of fresh, relevant content.
  • Incorporating blogging as part of a company’s internet marketing strategy provides the company with a good opportunity to be found in the search engines for the company’s desired markets.
3. Create a network for your business online.
  • One of the most popular and highly addictive web 2.0 mediums for online consumers are the social networks.
  • Social networks allow consumers and business professionals to network among friends, strangers, acquaintances, and professionals all in one place.
  • If small businesses keep an open mind and keep their networks open they have the potential to grow their networks exponentially by allowing other consumers into their fold.
  • Social networks also allow businesses to update the public on new improvement in product lines, what an average day is like at xyz company. Social networks are varied in purpose and the amount of social networks can be mind numbing, but the most popular platforms determined by marketing research about consumer online behavior are currently LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.
  • It brings you closer to the people who require your website, products, and line of business the most and gives you information about experience and feedback’s of your target market. 
4. Syndicate your content from your business to your online site.

  • Social networks and blog platforms are relatively low on cost investment, but they are far from maintenance free marketing endeavors.
    • To blog and create viable weekly online content the time commitment involved is a minimum of 5-10 hours a week.
    • How can you effectively communicate online through providing fresh and relevant information AND then market that information to all of your contacts across all of the social networks? The answer is syndication.
  • Syndicating content allows your message and your information to be reached across the worldwide web. You can syndicate your content by using an online social service that will broadcast your updates across the social networks. You can also syndicate your marketing collateral by using a service that will syndicate your flyers across social networks.

 Marketing tactics you may want to try out include:

  • Free classifieds
  • Pay-per-click advertising
  • Paid banner advertising
  • Writing articles that include links to your website
  • Starting a blog
  • Participating in forums and newsgroups
  • Starting an e-mail newsletter



Seven tips and tricks to help grow your new venture

business, Grow fast in startup, start a business, startups, Uncategorized




Growing any business is a challenge. Growing a new business–which usually also means limited resources to invest–is many times more difficult.


Here are seven tips and tricks to help grow your new venture with no money.

Build relationships. Relationships matter and good ones may be the most important things to your new business. So go get some. Go to meetings, meetups, panel discussions at colleges and universities, drop by your chamber of commerce or industry association. These events and opportunities are almost always free and the people there are usually as eager to meet you as you are to meet them.
“Every new person you meet is a potential relationship that can last a life long. Think about how this person can be of value to other in your network and watch you network grow. The more deposits you make the greater the return.”  

Be valuable. Exchanging business cards isn’t enough. Don’t think about how someone you meet can help you–think first about how you can help them. Who do you already know that your new contact should meet? Do you know another event that could interest them? Giving value is valuable. Everyone wants to help people who help them and being valuable is the best, fastest and most genuine way to get value in return.
“To be truly considered valuable, it’s important to be known as a relationship broker and thought leader. This happens through actions not promises. If you are consistently connecting people to relevant contacts and information on a weekly basis to help them achieve their goals, especially when they don’t ask for help, then you will receive similar value from the right individuals in your network in due time.”  

Think out loud. Thought leadership (sharing your ideas about your business, market, trends or most anything) helps spread your name and makes it easier for the public to understand you and what you do.  You can post in comment sections on industry publications, for example. If you read an interesting news or opinion article, draft a response and send it in–many publications will share your well-reasoned and well-written views. And you can always start your own blog or get a free blogging site on places such as Blogger.

Make something free. People love free stuff. If you have a blog, offer free publicity. If you’re a consultant, offer a free initial review. Give away a free trial on your business software site. Meeting people, regardless of how or why they come to you, is an opportunity to build relationships. And giving away free things can, if done right, spark a good marketing and press opportunity.
“Customers tend to gravitate towards companies that are generous with information and support up front,”
“Pre-customer service can be a valuable asset to any business.”

Keep stats. As your business grows, if you count it, record it. You never know what information in your hands today will be important to your decision-making tomorrow. If you’re scoring website hits when you post to an industry blog, that’s good to know.

“Identify the numbers actually matter and becoming intimate with what drives those metrics north or south.” 

Be patient. Rome, as they used to say, wasn’t built in a day. If you decide to invest your time in a tactic–thought leadership for example–don’t change course immediately if you don’t see results. These things take time and build on one another. Once you’ve made a decision, make sure you give it more than enough time to work before you go in another direction.

Search, copy, paste. Find out what other leaders and businesses have done to be successful. Then copy and paste. You don’t need to be a detective–often times, you can simply ask. As long as they are not a competitor, people are usually happy to share successes and advice. And when you find a trick or tactic that seems to have worked, try it.

Don’t be too proud to adapt a good idea to your businesses.

That’s seven. What else do you suggest? Follow tip number three and leave your ideas in the comments section.

Five Experts, Five Tips For Business Success

business, entrepreneurs, forbes, Grow fast in startup, start a business, startups, Uncategorized

Below, gain five tips from five industry leading experts on how to make 2015 your best year yet.

1. Treat customers like guests in your home. 
While there will always be customers who have decreased attention, are in a hurry, or appear to be frazzled, you want to still aim to deliver strong customer care despite customer scenarios. One way to do this is to treat customers as if they are guests in your home.”
Kirt Manecke, customer service expert and author of the book “Smile: Sell More with Amazing Customer Service” 
2. Belong to at least three professional organizations. 
I always suggest to business owners that they belong to at least three professional assocations. First, you should belong to your local Chamber of Commerce or downtown business association. That is where you business is and where your employees often live. Moreover, you should belong to your specific industry trade association. And last, you should belong to a statewide association because most legislation happens at state level, and you need eyes and ears looking out for you business. In most cases, a retail association will fill that role.”
Curtis Picard, Executive Director of the Retail Association of Maine
3. Participate in e-commerce. 
The future of e-commerce belongs to small businesses. This is the biggest opportunity for retailers since farmer’s markets began hundreds of years ago.People often believe setting up an online store is expensive and difficult, but this is not the case.”
Harley Finkelstein, Chief Platform Officer at Shopify.com
4. Introduce commerce and charity. 
Research shows that 83 percent of customers want to buy products that benefit a cause. Combining your business with a charity of your choice is a great way to gain consumer attention while increasing sales.”
Dan McCabe, Director of SixDegrees.org
5. Embrace the cloud. 
The cloud is here to stay and Windows is dead. Over the next three to five years, the cloud will really come of age for small businesses, and Windows-based POS (point of sale) and other opersations will disappear. Retailers and small businesses must think about upgrading their technology – with cloud being the obvious choice.”

Warning Signs That Your Business Partnership Is Failing

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You need to read these steps for good health of partnership. Because, A business partnership can be every bit as complicated as a marriage. And, like matrimony, some partnerships end unhappily.

Wouldn’t it be helpful if you could spot the warning signs of
an implosion before it occurred — or, better yet, before you even entered the partnership? That way, you could escape the situation before it turned ugly, got expensive, or wrecked what you’d built through long, hard work.
Actually, you can. Here are five signs that your shared business may be in trouble, so that perhaps you can rethink the partnership before it’s too late.
1. Unfair or Unbalanced Roles
Like a good marriage, a good business partnership brings together two people whose personalities, skill sets, intelligence, know-how, and other attributes complement each other. When properly balanced, the partnership produces a union that’s more powerful than either person acting alone.
But a successful partnership can’t happen or endure when there’s a fundamental imbalance. Trouble generally arises when one partner feels he or she has too much or too little:
  • authority,
  • responsibility,
  • time commitments, or
  • investment in a desired outcome.
The ideal situation is one in which each partner feels good about his or her contributions and the other partner’s efforts.
Of course, the requirements of a business are constantly shifting. So, a successful partnership needs not only an initial balance, but also a mechanism for re-balancing the partners’ individual workloads as often as necessary.
2. Financial Disagreements
Business is closely tied to money, and it involves making myriad decisions about spending, investing, receiving, and controlling funds. Some of these decisions inevitably are based on value judgements, such as whether you spend more in order to buy domestically-made goods or operate in a “green” way.

Spending much money without asking to your partners, hidden transactions, hiding clients payments etc. These are major issue in financial disagreement. 

Because
cash flow is central to your business, significant disagreements about spending signal a fundamental partnership problem. As time goes on, there’s a good chance you will become dissatisfied with your partner’s preferences regarding money — and tire of your constant tussling over it.
3. Unresolved Issues
This is not important to see the world in same way as other partners do. May be there some likes and dislikes, agreed or not. Problem is to resolve them by talking much more about the issue.

Disagreements are not necessarily a problem, but difficulties in resolving disagreements are. Psychologically, the inability to resolve conflicts often signals basic incompatibilities in a partnership, personal dislike, or divergent worldviews and values. But even if all that stays in the subconscious background, difficulty resolving disagreements generally reflects important differences in communication styles, priorities, and personal flexibility, any of which can put extra pressure on a relationship.

From a business perspective, disagreements that continue for long periods produce resentment, waste time, and impede effective management of the business. So, make every effort to settle disagreements respectfully, in a way that recognizes the worthwhile aspects of each partner’s point of view. Ongoing friction is usually a sign the partnership will end badly.
4. Different Ways of Working
Differences in work styles can produce conflicts and resentments that steadily build up until the partnership falls apart. For example, one partner may:
  • rarely or never take time off, while the other partner cherishes regular “off hours”;
  • obsess over certain issues, while the other partner thinks them through to a suitable policy and moves on; or,
  • insist on volunteering their services for certain causes or decline certain business opportunities in order to reinforce personal values that the other partner deems irrelevant to the business.
The partners may begin with a good deal of tolerance for each other’s “quirks.” But fundamental differences are likely to chip away at even the strongest bonds.
5. Different Exit Strategies
How you plan to exit the business in the future can have a profound impact on day-to-day decisions and operating strategies. If partners are interested in divergent outcomes, they’re frequently going to feel driven toward different choices, such as:
  • taking cash out of the business early versus delaying immediate income in favor of investment toward long-term growth; or
  • running everything personally based on “gut feelings” vs. establishing policies and developing staff so that the business can run without the partners’ close oversight.
Individually, none of these differences create an immediate or inevitably fatal flaw in a partnership, of course. But they do send up a red flag in terms of the potential for long-term mutual satisfaction and success in the partnership, and the greater number of these problems that describes your partnership, the bigger the risk tends to be.

Grow Your Business Tips

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  • Always provide value and service to those who may be your customers, even if they are not currently. When they do need your product, you want them to think of you first.
  • With the advent of the internet, online businesses are probably the easiest way to start and very much less expensive in terms of start-up cost than an offline counterpart.
  • Keep learning, and be adaptable to change. Find buddies, mentors, local business-related organizations, Internet forums, and wikis to discuss the daily details of running a small business. It’s much easier for everyone to perform their core businesses well and prosper when they don’t waste time and energy “reinventing the wheel” on housekeeping.
  • A franchise is a great idea although the start-up capital is way too high for most people.
  • Most direct selling companies have low start up capital compared to a traditional brick and mortar business. You can also break even rather quickly compared to the traditional business.
  • You can also consider trading on eBay or Flipkart, Snapdeal.
  • It is ok to start small with one or two products and then add more and more great ideas as you go!
  • Don’t be afraid to experiment with prices. You should determine the minimum price for your product or service to break even, but experiment with low-price or premium-price variations.

Launching Your Business – How to start small business – Part 6

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Launching Your Business

1. Secure space. Whether it’s an office, or a warehouse, if you need more space than your garage or your spare bedroom, now’s the time to get that.

  • If you don’t generally need an office beyond your home, but may occasionally need meeting space, there are often places downtown that can address those needs. A quick Google search on “business meeting rentals [your city/state]” will deliver plenty of rental options in your area.
2. Build your product or develop your service. Once you have the business all planned, financed, and have your basic level of staffing, get going. Whether that’s sitting down with the engineers and getting the software coded and tested, or getting materials sourced and shipped to your fabrication room (aka “garage”), or purchasing in bulk and marking up the price, the building process is the time during which you prepare for market. During this time, you may discover things such as:

  • Needing to tweak the ideas. Perhaps the product needs to be a different color, texture or size. Maybe your services need to be broader, narrower or more detailed. This is the time to attend to anything that crops up during your testing and development phases. You’ll know innately when something needs tweaking to make it better or to make it less like a competitor’s stale offerings.
  • Getting feedback. Friends and family make great resources for asking questions and getting feedback––don’t hesitate to use them as your sounding board.
  • Needing to increase the size of your premises. This happens more often than expected. Once the stock starts piling up, you may find it ends up in your living room, bedroom and the garden shed. Think rental of storage premises if needed.

3. Launch your product or your service. When the product is all built, packaged, coded, online, and ready to sell, or when your services are fully worked out and ready to go, hold a special event to launch your business. Send out a press release, announce it to the world. Tweet it, Facebook it, let the word resound to all corners of your market—you have a new business!

  • Hold a party and invite people who can spread the word for you. It doesn’t need to be pricey––purchase the food and drink from bulk discount stores and get family and friends to help with catering (you can give them a product or service in return).